THOMAS ALEXANDER BEAVITT
Researcher, Institute of Law and Philosophy, Russian Academy of Sciences (Ural Branch), Ekaterinburg, Russian Federation.
tommy@globalvillagebard.org
Thomas Alexander Beavitt was born on the 19th of April, 1968 in Sydney, Australia. His father and mother had arrived in Australia the previous year as part of their round-the-world journey from Britain, which included driving overland as far as India. In 1969, the Beavitts made the journey back to Britain, visiting several countries on the way, including Japan and parts of the Soviet Union. Following their return, Thomas would spend the next five years in Northamptonshire, England.

Thomas' father Alan, who was growing increasingly disillusioned with his work as a research physicist, had always dreamt of becoming a violin maker and pursuing this craft far from centres of civilisation. A chance encounter led to the Beavitts moving to the ad-hoc "alternative community" of Scoraig in the Scottish Highlands in 1974. Here, Thomas had an unconventional upbringing, attending the small primary school until 1980, at which time he was enrolled in Ullapool High School. To begin with, his educational achievements were quite impressive; however, a rebellious phase at around the age of 16 led to his increasing disillusionment with formal studies and a summer spent working at the famous Glastonbury music festival. In 1985/86, Thomas attended the specialist music unit at Broughton school in Edinburgh.

Since January 2015, Thomas has been living in Ekaterinburg. He is employed as a researcher at the Kafedra of Foreign Languages at the Instutite of Philosophy and Law, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, where he provides linguistic support to colleagues, at the same time as pursuing research, musical and poetic projects with collaborators in Ekaterinburg and elsewhere. As well as in academic and artistic circles, he is active on social media, taking a strong interest in philosophy, linguistics and international relations (especially between Russia and the countries of the west). He has been involved in a number of higher-profile, public-facing projects in recent years, including a 2015 performance of his English translations of the Songs of the Great Patriotic War on the Mamaev Kurgan in Volgograd with other foreign guest singers and a Russian orchestra. Thomas is well-known, both in Russia and elsewhere, for his translations of Russian bards and poets including Vladimir Vysotsky and Mikhail Lermontov. He is currently working with pianist Alexander Polyakov to perform Schubert's lieder cycles in English, Russian and German.
Thomas will present on: "Сontextual Definiteness and the "Dialogic We" in Scientific Communication".

In the context of teaching writing and other scientific communicational skills to students of English as a Second Language (ESL) / English for Academic Purposes (EAP), one issue that continues to crop up is how to teach correct use of zero, indefinite and definite articles. While various existing approaches are successfully used to teach near-native article use competency, the final stage of native-equivalent article use continues to evade even advanced ESL / EAP students, especially those whose first language (e.g. Russian) does not possess articles. Our research is aimed at developing a new approach to teaching article use based on a consideration of the development of context in scientific communication. In so doing, we also consider the related issue of when or whether to use active constructions whose subject is the first-person plural pronoun "WE". We show that the choice whether to use definite, indefinite and zero articles implies the emergence of a "dialogic WE" in which the emerging contextual definiteness of specialised terms and concepts becomes part of the implicit and – as developed as part of a dialogic communication process – explicit knowledge shared between writer and reader or speaker and interlocutor. We argue that good scientific writing style should make careful use of "WE" in active constructions, avoiding a conflation of the 5 WEs: researchers; authors; scientific community; humanity as a whole; and the specific "dialogic WE" that emerges from the context developed by the particular scientific communication.
The identification of this "dialogic WE" in terms of its shared implicit and explicit knowledge can also inform the appropriate use of other linguistic structures, including selecting appropriate tenses, choosing between noun phrase (NP) structures, employing standard phraseological collocations, as well as deploying conjunctive adverbs and other linking elements at the level of sentence, paragraph and argument.

Book design is the art of incorporating the content, style, format, design, and sequence of the various components of a book into a coherent whole. In the words of Jan Tschichold, "methods and rules upon which it is impossible to improve, have been developed over centuries. To produce perfect books, these rules have to be brought back to life and applied."
Front matter, or preliminaries, is the first section of a book, and is usually the smallest section in terms of the number of pages. Each page is counted, but no folio or page number is expressed, or printed, on either display pages or blank pages.
Publications
Journal Articles

"English as a means of scientific communication: Linguistic imperialism or interlingua?" Natalia G. Popova, Thomas Beavitt (Mar 2017)

Conformity in Modern Science: An Engine of Societal Transformation? Natalia G. Popova, Yan Moiseenko, Thomas Beavitt (Dec 2017)

Translating Winterreise: Sense and Singability Thomas Beavitt (May 2018)

Translating Schubert's Winterreise: Sense and Singability Thomas Beavitt (Oct 2018)

Three Aspects of the Phenomenon of Science: In Search for Unity among Sociologists Natalia G. Popova E. V. Biricheva Thomas Beavitt (Dec 2018)

TRANSLATING LERMONTOV'S 1831-go IYUNYA 11 DNYA: PROSODIC FEATURES AND THEIR EMOTIONAL-PROPHETIC CARGO Thomas Beavitt (May 2019)
Education:
- B.A. Open University (2011)
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Currently working as a Researcher at the Department of Foreign Languages, Institute of Law and Philosophy, Russia Academy of Sciences (Ural Branch). In addition to teaching and providing linguistic support to my Russian colleagues, I am presently researching a number of topics in applied linguistics. In particular, I am interested in the question of rhythm (isochrony) in human language and other forms of signalling. Research and practical activities in this area include the translation and performance of songs and poems. I am currently researching similarities between such disparate isochronous signalling processes as rap music (in Russian and English), nightingale song and Russian Orthodox bell-ringing (kolokol'nïy zvon).
Since January 2015, Thomas has been living in Ekaterinburg. He is employed as a researcher at the Kafedra of Foreign Languages at the Instutite of Philosophy and Law, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, where he provides linguistic support to colleagues, at the same time as pursuing research, musical and poetic projects with collaborators in Ekaterinburg and elsewhere.
Thomas Beavitt
Translator and singer from Scotland
He has been involved in a number of higher-profile, public-facing projects in recent years, including a 2015 performance of his English translations of the Songs of the Great Patriotic War on the Mamaev Kurgan in Volgograd with other foreign guest singers and a Russian orchestra. Thomas is well-known, both in Russia and elsewhere, for his translations of Russian bards and poets including Vladimir Vysotsky and Mikhail Lermontov. He is currently working with pianist Alexander Polyakov to perform Schubert’s lieder cycles in English, Russian and German.
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