DAVID WANSBROUGH
an Australian poet, writer, artist and philosopher
David Wansbrough was invited to Russia twice yearly from 1993 to 2004 as a visiting professor at Moscow State University.

Eleven of his books have been published in Russian language editions. In September 2019 the Dolgoprudny Museum exhibited his illustrations for books created with Nikolai Nikolaevich Drozdov. David has had 11 books published in Russia. Awarded the Russian medal, Man of Peace, he was the 2013 International Eco Brand Person of the Year.

His education was in pedagogics, then his scientific research was in Theology and Perceptual Studies.

He currently edits the English language of papers for international academic journals.
David will present on: "The Power of Language".
On a psychological level, all academic and scientific papers are really very similar to sale pitches in car yards.
You are trying to sell the Abstract without your peers kicking the tires too hard. Then you must sell the validity of your experimental techniques and give the logbook which honestly includes the faults and close the deal with your conclusion. The scientific paper must drive away.
But a scientific paper must also have all the characteristics of good poetry. It must express concepts powerfully, succinctly,- and be memorable.
Although objective, it must vividly convey intent.
The good verse makes nouns active into gerunds and, like academic papers, must avoid adverbs and adjectives.
The verse refers to implicit experiences beyond itself. We have to know what is being referred to as a poem to work.
But a scientific paper must have a detailed reference section so that we are certain that we have a common verifiable background.
Poetry describes the ineffable. Physics and maths have their own symbolic abstract languages to describe the sublime, but that must be conveyed and be substantiated by words to explain the context.
Ultimately, in communication between You and Me, we rely on words to show truth, affection, grief, and joy. And hopefully, find a way to endure the human condition.
Made on
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